AWARD

Sunday, 17 February 2013

I'M IN "HOT" WATER

Quite a while ago, in one of my MANY trips to the thrift store, I bought  this gel candle.   I thought it looked like water and it does.  It had embedded within it some tiny toys that I was determined to get out so after some thought, I began digging away with a pair of tweezers to try to extract them. In doing so, the results on the surface of the candle was that of churning, turgid water!  "Wow", I thought "that effect could come in handy" and I filed it away in the Rolodex in my head.  So today, while cleaning up my workroom ( Yet Again), I decided to take a break and start surfing through Pinterest, one of my favorite things to do.  In the process, I found a spaghetti prep board that had a pot with some resin water inside and the handful of spaghetti in the pot.  What intrigued me was the water!  It was just lying there and I wondered then, if I could do the same with the pot and the gel candle and the spaghetti that I had used in "What's For Dinner?" and make the water "MOVE"
I decided to give it a try.


I began by using one of the pots I had made already.  This pot is coated on the inside with silver nail polish from REVLON called 'Sterling #041'.  This is the best silver nail enamel for this project and I just recently found it for sale again at WalMart, after the drugstore discontinued it.
HOORAY!

I lit the candle and crossed my fingers that the idea would work.

I wanted to melt enough wax to be able to pour it into the pot.  When I had a little melted, I tipped the glass and poured a bit into the bottom of the pot.  The nail polish remained stable and the base provided the glue for the spaghetti noodles to rest on.

Here are the noodles in the pot with just a little bit of the wax in the pot.  The biggest concern now was the soot that came flowing down into the wax as the glass was tipped on its side.  Because the pot is deep and the water backed by the silver polish, it is not that noticeable but if the container is clear then probably, heating it over boiling water would keep the clarity.

This is where I started playing with the texture of the water!  When I had poured another  layer, I started to mix it up with the tweezers and tried to get bubbles by stirring it with a toothpick.  It is beginning to look active!

Stirring the Pot!

"BUBBLE, BUBBLE, TOIL AND TROUBLE!"
it works!

This is now a steaming pot of Boiling Water!

So here is the pot of spaghetti ready to sit on the stove and look REALLY HOT!
Done with gel candle wax

OH YEAH!


elizabeth

27 comments:

  1. Hi Elizabeth,
    That is an amazing result! Wondering if the steam is stable?
    I have yet to use the gel that you gave me. I do know that it does not melt over boiling water. I think that it will have to be spooned into a tin can and then the can put on the stove.
    Hope to see you soon.
    Janine

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    1. Hello dear friend! I made the steam removable. It is just posing for the camera! I didn't want the fibers all mixed up into the wax. Yuk. If I remember correctly, what I had tried once before, was to scoop some out and placed it in the microwave for mere seconds, to keep the wax clear yet fluid. I wasn't sure if a pot of boiling water with the candle in the middle would be a better solution. It does not take as much time to liquify these gels as it does the paraffin wax candles. I should retry the 2 methods once again instead of just speculating. Thanks for the Heads Up Janine!

      elizabeth

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    2. Janine, you got me thinking and I have just returned from trying out both methods of melting the gel candle wax. 1) I tried it first in the microwave as I afore mentioned and the results are that it took at least 4 minutes on high to melt the wax, not the "seconds" that I thought I remembered. I used a glass to put the gel in and then kept repeating the minute timer until it was liquified. So I was wrong it takes longer to melt than I had thought in the microwave.
      2) I tried it in a glass dish in a pot of boiling water and it melted quicker by about 20-30 seconds and yet it seemed a bit gooier than the microwave method, not sure why. It seemed to be stringy when I stirred it about but as I say it melted fine. So next time I say something is so, I will make certain that I test it again and not rely solely on my fallible memory. Thanks again my friend.
      elizabeth

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  2. What a cool idea. It does look like boiling water. Thanks for the tip. IndyPoppy

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    1. Thank you Indy-Poppy! I actually hadn't planned to do this tutorial. But I loved the experiment and I thought it would be fun to try and then I thought it would be interesting to document and to share. I am glad that you enjoyed it!

      elizabeth

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  3. Hi Elizabeth, WOW what a great idea and the end result is very realistic. Pinterest is such a BIG source of inspiration and idea's! Wishing you a wonderful day! gr. AM

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    1. Thanks AM! Yes Pinterest IS full of great Ideas and it always amazes me, how a piece of scrap material can be totally transformed into something wonderful! Rarely do two people see things the say way! I have been trying to collect tutorials in My Pinterest folder, ( "Doing Just A Little") and I must say, the wealth of information out there is STAGERING! For anyone looking for inspiration, Pinterest is the place to go!

      elizabeth

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  4. Oh yes! Loving to watch a boiling pot of pasta! Great idea Elizabeth. Can't wait to see it live!
    Fats

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    1. Thanks Fats! This was an impromptu kinda spur of the moment tutorial and it was Lots of Fun!
      After Janines comment I decided to play with it some more so here is what I learned:

      1) If you heat it in the microwave it takes 4 minutes to melt. I used a glass dish for the container
      .
      2) If you DON'T LIKE how it is solidifying, you don't have to live with it. This morning I decided to try for More Bubbles in the water so I pulled out some of the gel with a pair of tweezers and remelted it in then repoured it. Works fine, I'm happy.

      3) The clean up is great and couldn't be easier! The gel comes away from the glass dish as easy as pie comes out of the pan and into my tummy. There is nothing leftover to ruin your glass container.

      4) These gel candles are amazingly dust inhibitors, they do Not attract dust and so the surface stays shiny and clean. I have had the candle sitting out on the top of a chest of drawers uncovered and there was nothing I had to scrap off prior to melting the gel!
      5) I would NOT light the wick because it DOES transfer soot into the gel. I was able to pick out the sooty pieces and put them in another container for something else that perhaps needs black water; a la' Harry Potter?.

      6) I made some Jellies many years ago with some colored gel and used mini molds for the project. After 12+ years they are still going strong! (JANE THIS IS FOR YOU) The Jellies are Jelly and they wiggle! They have not evaporated or shrunk in any perceptible way. So go to it ladybug!

      7) This IS a Cheap and Easy way to get a wet and wild look without the mixing and pouring of resin. The candle that I had originally had toys suspended within it so it could be used for an aquarium in miniature, or a wash tub.

      8) It can be colored using candle wax dyes made for wax candles ( I just read this in a book I just remembered I had/bought also at the thrift store!)
      WARNING
      9) I learned that Hot is HOT!!! and the glass heats up and the gel is oil based and scorching so if you use it; BE CAREFUL WITH IT! Safety First, PLEASE.

      Having said all of that I just close by saying that the book that I found at the thrift store is called " Fantastic Gel Candles" by Marcianne Miller, published by Lark Books 2002, a division of Sterling Publishing Co. Inc. 387 Park Ave. South, New York, N.Y. 10016
      None of the contents of the book are related to miniatures, But when has that ever stopped us!!!!???
      Have fun everyone!
      elizabeth

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  5. You have a amazing mini eye lady ;) This is a wonderful cheap alternative to resin or glaze ..ohhhh the uses * taps fingers*

    Thank you, miss mad mini scientist ;P

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    1. Hello Jane! Read the reply to Fatima to get a few more details and then "Start Cookin"! No doubt with all the considerable skills that you ALREADY possess in your mini culinary arsenal, you will produce the most wonderful spread imaginable. I really enjoyed the corned beef and cabbage that you just posted! What is next on the menu?
      Can't Wait!

      elizabeth

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  6. Great idea! The result is realistic.
    Bye Faby

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    1. Thank you Fabiola! I have to say that it turned out BETTER than I expected! I originally bought the candle to melt and eventually pour into a bathtub because it looks like water in the glass and the color was perfect for a white enameled tub. But, I'm not even close to working on the bathtub so this gave me a head start on what to expect when I do finally get to work on the doll's house bathroom. I will think of this as a practice run!
      elizabeth

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  7. My mum, my brother and I made lots of candles like this when I was a kid for Christmas gifts to the family. I have to look at mums and see if she have any liquid-candels left =) I always thought it was too bubbly to use for miniatures, but you've shown me it fits just right for boiling water =)

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  8. Hello Hannah! You are the first person I know that has actually made these types of candles. My mother used to make wax candles for Christmas back in the 60's and what I recall most was the MESS! The pot the beaters the reams of newspaper to catch the drips! and then the disposal of it all afterwards was such a pain! Ah, childhood!... Anyway, you are right, the book said that the bubbles were the MOST to be Feared in working with this medium, It said to minimize bubbles," pour like you would a beer to get less suds- by holding the container at an angle and pouring slowly." Well then I guess if you DO want BUBBLES then I would pour directly from the top and quickly! I didn't though, because the container was small and I just thought that I could whip air into it with the toothpick, which worked out fine.
    OH by the Way, I found out too, that If you want to smooth out a rough patch, just light a match and hold it to the place that you want to correct and the gel melts just there and smokes a bit then
    remove the heat and it sets up again. I LOVE THIS STUFF!!!
    I hope that your mum still has some Gel Candles, Hannah. Keep me posted on how you use them, it is sooo interesting and Soooo MUch Fun!

    eliabeth

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    1. Hello all...
      The sad thing is that I did make these back when and I still have containers with it if I look hard enough. When I do see them I think I shall throw them out then I don't. I must have been thinking into the future...
      fats

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    2. I just remember that this after the years collects lots of dust, do you have any tip for that? my candles was a bit oily and got a bit sticky at the top after a few years... maybe it doesn't come in contact with that mush dust in the dollhouse like a candle at the table does?!

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    3. Hello again, Hannah! Thanks for that information! Perhaps there are different grades or kinds of gel candles,( Just as with anything I guess.) The gel candles that I have used and the one I just used have been sitting out in the open unprotected by any cover. They are not sticky and/or oily. However, I just spoke to Janine, a few minutes ago and she says that her candle is sticky on the surface too, like yours. So not being knowledgeable enough to know how to tell what is what or which is which, as the candles were already made, I would suggest that, if they are sticky then use them only where you will be able to seal them from the dust ie. a canning jar etc. If the gel breaks away and doesn't leave a filmy residue on your fingers like the one I use in this tutorial well, I would give it a go ahead. Not being an expert in this I am just offering advise. Dust is one of those inevitibles,( unfortunately) but so far so good, on my end. As far as cleaning them, I haven't a clue! I have not had to clean any of the ones I have made into jellies although they have been exposed to the air for years. I think the best advise is to check the internet for further information. Remember, I am doing a lot of this for the first time in a long time too and I am learning as I go, too. I don't want you to be disappointed so best to check with it out on the NET if you have any reservations. Have fun and thanks for the follow up.
      elizabeth

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  9. Amazing tutorial. Thank you. I do hope to try it sometime. I will send you some pics tomorrow!

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  10. That's great Lucille! I look forward to it! Yay!
    elizabeth

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  11. TO ALL MY READERS;
    AS MENTIONED, I AM RELATIVELY NEW TO THIS GEL CANDLE EXPERIENCE AND THE ABOVE POSTING WAS JUST A FUN EXPERIMENT THAT I WANTED TO SHARE WITH YOU. I STRONGLY SUGGEST AND ENCOURAGE EVERYONE TO CHECK THE INTERNET FOR INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO HANDLE THIS PRODUCT SAFELY!!
    IN THE BOOK I QUOTED THERE IS ALSO THIS WARNING;
    "BECAUSE THE GEL IS MADE OF OIL IT IS FLAMMABLE-THAT IS WHY IT IS USED TO MAKE CANDLES....KEEP A LID HANDY TO SMOTHER ANY FIRES OR USE BAKING SODA, NOT WATER! THE GEL CAN REACH A FLASH POINT MORE QUICKLY THAN EXPECTED,
    ---- AND DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT HEATING GEL IN THE MICROWAVE. IT DOESN'T WORK, IT MAY INJURE YOU AND IT WILL RUIN YOUR MICROWAVE "-------

    SO THAT IS WHAT THE BOOK SAID AND I AM PASSING THAT ON TO YOU, NOW AFTER HAVING USED IT IN MY MICROWAVE! I USED THE EQUIVALENT OF 1 TABLESPOON IN A GLASS CONTAINER AND IT MELTED IN 4 MINUTES AS I MENTIONED EARLIER. THIS WAS BEFORE I READ THAT IT COULDN'T BE DONE.
    ALTHOUGH I BELIEVE THAT THIS IS IN REFERENCE TO LARGE AMOUNTS OF GEL, I BELIEVE IN SAFETY FIRST AND I DON'T WANT ANYONE GETTING INJURED OR WRECKING THEIR MICROWAVES OR SETTING THEIR HOMES ON FIRE, SO AGAIN.....

    PLEASE BE CAREFUL WITH THIS PRODUCT AND CHECK THE NET FIRST FOR PROFESSIONAL ADVISE!!!

    elizabeth

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  12. Awesome! I'm gobsmacked by the reality of your steaming bubbling pot of spaghetti. You are a brilliant lateral thinker.

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  13. Hello Dear Susan! I keep finding You in the most unlikely places throughout my blog! hahha Thanks for taking the time to backtrack and also leave a comment! This was a fun but aggravating tutorial to do and it takes longer to achieve than it looks in the blog! The gel sets up Very Quickly and if it is not Liquid and Hot enough initially, it means running back to the microwave and trying again and again. I did this in February and it is now the end of June and the bubbles are still there! It WAS messy but it was a spur of the moment experiment and it worked.

    Lateral thinking!? Is that what you call it?

    I just call it having FUN!

    elizabeth

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  14. Replies
    1. I am so glad that you have enjoyed this tutorial Claude! I used this same gel candle principal for the tub water on "How Arthur took a Bath". Lots of fun to do and if you make a mistake, just scoop it out and start again. No Muss, no Fuss!

      elizabeth

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  15. That's a very cool idea :o) well done you! I'll share this on my FB page and see if others have similar stories. https://www.facebook.com/onetwelveminimodelling/

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    1. Hi Sandy! I am Delighted that you like this idea, however I should tell you that the "bubbles" level out over time. It takes a while for it to happen but eventually it does.
      So sad:(

      elizabeth

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