Friday, 25 September 2015

Meeting "RUSTY" at the game


Hi everyone!  I would like to introduce you to an old friend of mine named "RUSTY"
Actually,... I tell a lie because THIS RUSTY, is actually
a NEW RUSTY to me.  Yet even though I have only just met him, it feels like I've known him forever!  
But let me tell you how it was that we came to meet in the first place.   
It all started with a  Basket Ball Game......
It was a kid's broken pinball- type of toy, which I found at the thrift store. 
I bought the toy with the intention of removing the two plastic fretwork baskets that were suspended inside.  This, I did as soon as I arrived home.  I proceeded to add a new wider rim to the top of each of the baskets (the rims are made of heavy card ).  I then found 2 bases for the baskets in the form of  a  couple of plastic caps which proved to be the perfect fit for the bottom of the hoops and finally I  glued on 4 bead feet for each, to act as supports.  After the glues were dried, both baskets were then spray-painted with several coats of a Matt BBQ spray paint. 
I was pretty happy with they way they looked, but then of course,....
that was before I met 

 RUSTY.
I am a sucker for most "old- looking things" and especially when it comes to Cast Iron whether it's real or in miniature.
These "Cast Iron" baskets needed a little rust, and that is where Rusty came into the picture.
(go and check out the following post for a step by step tutorial)
 http://www.deannario.com/2013/10/creating-faux-rust-diy.html

the tutorial had all the things that I like most:
It was CHEAP! 
It was FUN! 
and it was SOOOOOOO EASY! 
which meant that even I could do it!!!
So because of what the tutorial recommended, I re-painted the black of each basket with an overlay of black acrylic paint.
And while it was still wet, I shook on some
GROUND CINNAMON right over top of the wet paint, and knocked off the excess.




It works!

However, what I found was that the paint dried quicker than I wished, and so I had to keep adding more paint to build up the rust. I was beginning to lose the definition of the wonderful fretwork of the cast iron so I thought of something else.
SCENIC SPRAY GLUE
by Scene A Rama 

I still had lots of this very thin spray glue which I'd purchased from the  hobby train store,
( but available also at MICHAEL'S)
 which was left over from the all of landscaping
that I'd done for #43 Green Dolphin Street, and so I gave the baskets a spray of this lightweight adhesive and then added MORE CINNAMON.  
The results were 100% better!!!!
The cinnamon stuck AND it could be built up, layer after layer without clogging up the fretwork as you can see in the photo below.  It dries super fast, but even after spraying more of this glue onto the painted and "rusted"surface, the details remained clear and true. 
After I got the look of rust that I wanted,  I gave the entire piece an additional spray of the same thin-set glue, to seal the cinnamon onto the baskets and I let dry.

The final touch was to add bits of this lighter grey onto the basket just to break up the rust and make the iron look a little more authentic.




easy peasy!




Not a bad deal for a $5.00 basketball toy and a little bit of cinnamon.

SCORE!!! :D

elizabeth





69 comments:

  1. I'm bowing down at your feet. Wow! They look old and heavy and rusty. Great job, Elizabeth! Cinnamon - who would have thunk it??

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    1. Thank You Claudia, but this idea originated with Deanna Rio, the "Cinnamon Lady" :D I will say however, that your compliment about the baskets looking "old, heavy and rusty" makes my heart Glad; especially the "heavy" part. :)) Trying to add visual weight where there is none, can be an iffy trick, which doesn't always work for me without a whole lot of extra effort. This technique was the least amount of work and had the most authentic end results of any that I have ever tried, and I can highly recommend it! :D

      elizabeth

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  2. Wow, that's ingenious Elizabeth! I would never have thought of using cinnamon! One tip for slowing paint drying time is to use an extender or retarder medium mixed with your paint. Works like a charm. Have a great weekend. Hope you get some miniing done.

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    1. Hi Shannon! Although I can take NO CREDIT for the cinnamon idea, I knew it would be something that other miniaturists would be able to use, which was why I tried it out
      You're Right and Thanks for the reminder about the extender! I'd forgotten all about that product, and I shall have to remember it for the next time I need to use an acrylic paint, because it really does make the acrylic go the distance. Enjoy your weekend too, Shannon. We're expecting sunshine here on the west coat for tomorrow- hip hip HOORAY! :D

      elizabeth

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  3. It is a great technique. thank you for the tips. Whodathunkit. .Cinnamon... it's not just for toast anymore! ;-)

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    1. Hi Catherine! I totally LOVE, this method too, and what a happy day it was for me when I was able to try it out and put it to the test. :)) However, I will say that given a choice between cinnamon rust and cinnamon toast---- toast tastes better! :D

      elizabeth

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  4. That's amazing. My issue: I would want to eat a cinnamon bun as I "rusted" and then every time I took it out to use!

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    1. Hahahaha! Well Kat, my suggestion is to at least make it a "mini" cinnamon bun! :D

      elizabeth

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  5. Hi Everyone, I saw these yesterday (among other treasures), during our Miniteers meet and they look so authentic.
    It would be fun to give it a try Elizabeth - you always inspire!
    Janine

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    1. Thanks Janine! :D I was inspired by Deanna Rio and this rusting method that she so perfectly documented, seemed tailor-made for miniatures! The "RUST" is exactly the right scale as well as the right color, and sooooo easy and fun to do. I hope that everyone who needs to RUST SOMETHING will also give it a try! :D

      elizabeth
      p.s. It was good to be able to finally MINITEER together again, wasn't it?

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  6. Wow, Elizabeth - you've done it again! I so admire your amazing creative genius. I'm glad that I had a chance to meet "Rusty." What a great guy - and a great technique! I really like the way you keep trying different things - persistently - until you achieve exactly the effect you want. Bravo!

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    1. You know Marjorie, I have more fun making messes, than actually making things! I love THE PROCESS, and I have Piles of "fails" which are currently taking up way too much room in my workspace. Even so, I hate to throw them out because often ( if I wait long enough) they will spark another idea to try, which may turn them into something worthwhile after all. You just never know. But these two baskets will not be counted among the cast-offs, as this quick and easy rusting method, was a Dream to work with..... and BONUS..... it smells good too! :D

      elizabeth

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  7. Aaaaahhh, Elizabeth, I can see that you and "Rusty" are a "Match made in Heaven"! That tutorial got you started.... and then you went and did it the Elizabeth way and it got better and better!!! Cinnamon! I never would have thought of it... but gee it looks so Obvious once you show us how it is done!!! LOL! I LOVE it!!! And to think you are using little toy basketball hoops from the Thrift shop!!! (You must have a Fantastic Thrift shop!) I think I need to get better acquainted with the ones around here! Those "Old Iron Planters" you now have are Gorgeous and so original!!! It is what I Love about your work..... It is Truly unique and inimitable..... In the Best possible way!!! Please keep on good terms with Old "Rusty".... you never know when he will be needed! :)

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    1. Hi Betsy! When I say thrift store, I am usually referring to one of at least 4 Value Village stores that I regularly visit. They are not All Created Equal and when I am looking for a specific kind of item, I will target perhaps one store over and above, the others. I actually have to restrain myself from going for periods of time because it has become an addiction of sorts. "One man's junk is another man's treasure" as the saying goes but when there is many men's junk, just imagine all of the potential treasure that is there is to dig for! :D
      Some get their kicks from stores like Holt Renfrew, Nordstoms , and Macy's
      but I get mine from (sigh) - Value Village

      elizabeth
      p.s. I will be emailing you shortly; so let Hamish Harry know. :))

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  8. Well who would have think it! I love the way they came out and anxious to see them in place. I am also thinking they must smell pretty nice too!

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    1. Hi Grandmommy! That was just what I thought too... CINNAMON?... but in viewing the tutorial, the process was as easy as pie- so I gave it a try! :D
      However, the scent of cinnamon is only faintly detectable after everything has dried, but the rust results remain secured. :))

      elizabeth

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  9. Wooohh ! Géniale la cannelle ... Le rendu est parfait !
    Faire beaucoup avec peu ;) Bravo Elizabeth !
    Bises. joce

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    1. Hi Joce, My sentiments Exactly!!! :D "Do MORE with LESS!" I was done with "RUSTING" after about 30 minutes rather than the endless fussing and fiddling with multi-layer and countless mixes of paint. Plus, it was the resulting texture that had me SOLD on this method because the rusty finish is in perfect Scale! :D

      elizabeth

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  10. Un excelente efecto de oxidación!!!!!!
    Besos.

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    1. Hi Pilar! Thank You for enjoying my little rusting demo, but don't forget to check out the link to the step-by-step tutorial by Deanna Rio... She rusts Cardstock!:D

      elizabeth

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  11. Cinnamon!! of course!! Elizabeth, you are genial!!!!
    the effect is the most real I ever seen. I bought the special set for rusty someday, but these paints didn't work well and the effect was bad. Your cinnamon is the best! I have to find the spray glue, THANK YOU :-)

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    1. Hi Magda! Cinnamon Rust is Wonderful and soooooo easy! which I just can't stress enough!
      I have used the chemical rust kit where iron filings are painted onto the object to be rusted after which a chemical acid is painted atop of the ironize paint. I wasn't alway happy with the results, PLUS, the kit was expensive! This method is CHEAP and FAIL PROOF and the spray glue made it work a treat. Look for the adhesive in railroad hobby stores, where it be for sure. It comes as a pump spray which performs as both an adhesive, as well as a sealer.
      Have Fun!!! :D

      elizabeth

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  12. Hi Elizabeth! You did it again: cinnamon! Who has ever thought about using it for a rusty effect.....? Of course, YOU did it :D!! I've always thought how I would love to see you, busy in your workroom, inventing all kind of things for your miniatures, it must be interesting to see ;O!.
    I absolutely adore this very authentic rusty effect on the baskets, they really look awesome!
    Thank you so much for sharing this great tip with us all, it's very generous of you.
    Hugs, Ilona

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    1. Hi Ilona! Thank You and Welcome back from your Summer Holidays!!!! :D
      I can't take credit for this idea because it wasn't mine. Deanna Rio posted a Full-Sized tutorial (which I'd found via Pinterest), which looked so PERFECT for minis that I HAD to give it a tryout! :D
      I am Delighted with the RUSTY RESULTS and thought others might be just as intrigued as I was.
      But as to my workroom.... it ALWAYS looks like a bomb hit it!

      with me playing in the rubble. hahhahah
      ENJOY!

      elizabeth

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  13. a magnificent result: thank you for sharing

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    1. Hi Claude! :)) I have to say, that I have made myself HAPPY with these Rusty baskets, and that the cinnamon process was MORE than the sum of its parts!
      And knowing just how much that YOU enjoy "experimenting", I really hope that you'll be able to give it a try, because it certainly was "Good Fun!" :D

      elizabeth

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  14. Thanks for the tips. You're a great artist and I like your style.

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    1. Hi Faby! :)) Thank You and you are Most Welcomed for the tip and I hope that you'll take the opportunity to check out the link to the Deanna Rio tutorial, as well.
      What amazed me is just how realistic the RUST that she achieved was, and she did her on Heavy Cardboard. :D

      elizabeth

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  15. Elizabeth, you've done it again. Wish I could have been at the Miniteers get-together to see your wonderful work. Arrived in Budapest today after 2 weeks in Turkey. Have a great weekend.
    Cheers, Linda

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    1. Hi Linda....
      Would have been great to have you with us. Maybe next time.
      fats

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    2. Ditto Fats!!! You Were Missed Linda, but I hope that you know that you were in our thoughts!:D
      As a matter of fact Linda, I was thinking of your own personal story which you'd related of the experience that you had of a costly metal patio table rusting through because of an active chemical reaction, which subsequently destroyed your precious treasure :((

      If ONLY it had been treated with CINNAMON RUST instead.

      Have fun on your latest European Excursion,and lets talk again soon :D

      elizabeth

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  16. It is perfect, I admire how you try different things and are full of ideas. And you always manage to get things right with a very realistic result.
    Geneviève

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    1. Hi Genevieve! Thank You Very Much! :)) I actually PREFER to have several irons in the fire, ALL of the time which makes it difficult for me to stay ON TASK and get my BIG PROJECTS finished. I would much rather mess around with the LITTLE ONES such as this one was.
      I'm Delighted that you like the results of the CINNAMON RUST, and I encourage you to check out the link to the Deanna Rio tutorial, too! :D

      elizabeth

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  17. Yes...I too had the pleasure of meeting "Rusty" and you would not believe there was a bit of plastic anywhere. So real...so phenomenal! You've done it again.
    fats

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    1. Thanks Fats! :D It was a real Pleasure to introduce you and Janine to "RUSTY", and I so happy that he met with the approval of both of my friends. ( I shall make certain that I tell him so too! :D )
      What a great visit I had with you two last Thursday, which was like a MINITEER reunion of sorts - after such a long time apart. :D

      elizabeth

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  18. Ох,Элизабет! Что вы с нами делаете? Ваша работа всегда удивляет и восхищает! Невероятно! Настоящие, чугунные, тяжелые, старые и ржавые корзины!
    Вы большой художник! Чудо родилось из акриловой краски, корицы и лака!!!
    Татьяна

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    1. Hi Tatiana! It makes me Very Happy that you like the results of this Rusting Technique :D What I like most about it is that it translates so beautifully into miniature, and it saved me hours of fiddling about with paint mixes and was LOTS of FUN as well! I recommend checking out the link to see each step more clearly outlined, but I Thank You for all of your praise for the way that these 2 "Rusty Iron Baskets" turned out! :D

      elizabeth

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  19. La idea no será tuya pero has sabido usarla muy bien. Las canastas han quedado genial. Gracias por la información.

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    1. Hi Isabel! Thank You for enjoying this Rusting Technique that I have used for these 2 Iron Baskets. It is always fun when you can find something that was invented for Full-Sized Craft Projects and then shrink it down to work for our miniatures, wouldn't you agree? :D
      I hope that you will be able to find this method useful because I know that YOU are able to make FANTASTIC WROGHT IRON in miniature, not to mention, AMAZING STONEWORK and FLOWERS too! :D

      elizabeth

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  20. Oh Elizabeth! You will never believe this, but I am eating rice pudding as I am reading this and I almost choked! I have "rust" sprinkled on top of my food! Who knew?
    Looks fantastic.
    (Yes, I am a huge frequenter of multiple thrift stores too!)
    Hugs,
    Sam

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    1. hahahha Never fear Sam, this Cinnamon Rust is neither toxic or hazardous to your health!
      And don't you just love that it can multi-task too!? :D

      elizabeth
      Yay, thrift stores- long may they reign! :))

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  21. Interesting technique--thanks for sharing! xo Jennifer

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    1. Hi Jennifer! I thought so too!:D
      By the way, how is your mini Blythe collection progressing? And are there any new plushy friends on the horizon for Flossy and Sophie?

      elizabeth

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  22. Hi Elizabeth, this is such a clever and yet simple technique to get the appearance of rust. The planters do look very heavy and weathered. Thank you for sharing =0)

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    1. Hi Pepper! You are Most Welcome!:D I have to say again, that this was the quickest and most fun method of rusting that I have ever tried,( and I have tried out scads of different methods). This wasn't as messy as Ms. Rio's in her tutorial, and the excess Cinnamon is easily retrieved and can be re-used again later.

      elizabeth

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  23. Hi Elizabeth! I really love the baskets...I'll be borrowing this technique from you some day soon! I love the final effects, so incredibly believable! I love that you "see" the shapes in things and use those found objects to create such wonderful little pieces!

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    1. Hi Doug, I hope that you WILL use it! I can easily see this translated into many mini STEAMPUNK applications! :))

      And I Love the final effects too! :D

      elizabeth

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  24. Those turned out great, thanks for sharing the idea. :D

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    1. Hi Keli! Thank You Very Much! :)) This idea was just too good to keep to myself and knowing how much you enjoy aging projects,( ie. your English Kitchen and larder ), I anticipate that you too will come to find this technique useful.

      elizabeth

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  25. Thanks for introducing us to Rusty... what a fantastic and easy way to create a rusty look, your baskets look awesome. Nevertheless it's that little touch of zinc that does it in the end - and that's the Elizabethan way I guess. Looks like I should spare some cinnamon someday... hope the Christmas bakery, the apple pies and the milk rice will forgive me... ;O)

    Greetings
    Birgit

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  26. Greeting Birgit! I am so glad that you've enjoyed meeting my friend Rusty! I think though, that he is feeling somewhat overwhelmed by so many new admirers! :D
    Thanks for mentioning "that little touch of zinc", because it was after I added it that the rusty iron work took on its full bloom. :D
    You are making me hungry though with your mention of cinnamon and Christmas Baking! :D

    elizabeth

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  27. Hello Lady Elizabeth,
    Pretty good for $5.00 I would say! The rust technique is fantastic. The texture it adds is a great touch and it feels very realistic. This may be a silly question, but do they still smell of cinnamon, or did the sealer coat take it away?
    Thank you for the great post. Ain't nobody can do the tings that you do milady!
    Big hug
    Giac

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  28. Greetings Sir Giac!
    I am Very Pleased that you agree that these baskets were well worth my $5.00 SPLURGE! heeheehee
    And to answer your question, there IS a Very Faint Aroma of cinnamon but you are right, the sealer almost Deletes It completely. In fact, when I was showing them to Janine and Fatima, neither one could guess what the rust was and both had to hold them right up to their noses before they were convinced that the Rust WAS indeed Cinnamon.
    Big Hug Back! :D

    elizabeth

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  29. You are a treasure trove of information! Rust has been that one thing I couldn't figure out. I ca always do the color but never the texture. I can't thank you enough for passing on the knowledge!
    hugs♥,
    Caroline

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  30. Hi Caroline, I have felt EXACTLY the same as you. Until now, my RUST, has always felt rusty! I am certain that you will get Great Use out of this information, as I have done.
    Have Fun!!! :D

    elizabeth

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  31. Hi Elizabeth, these look wonderful! Oh and I know what you mean, I'm a sucker for everything looking old and cast iron too :D! You've done a great job, turning something cheap into something valuable and thanks for the info and link of the rusteffect!

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    1. Hi Monique! Thank You Very Much and you are Welcome! :)) I am a sucker for Iron Urns and have 5 in my Real Life Garden as well as a few small ones inside my house. I also love Iron trellises but it is the oxidization on everything that pleases me most, so being able to duplicate it in miniature, is BLISS!
      Enjoy the link:D

      elizabeth

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  32. Amazing, Elizabeth. You have such a good eye for these things.

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  33. Thank You Irene! :D I had fun with this project from beginning to end, but I recall that when I was at the checkout with my sister and Super Dave, they too asked me what I was planning to do with my broken toy. When I told them my sister shook her head in an "I should have known" kinda way.
    Some things look obvious to me but plenty of other things pass me by and then when I see the creativity and ingenuity of others, I feel just as gob-smacked and "amazed" and glad to be a part of this miniature world. :D

    elizabeth

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  34. Replies
    1. Hi Claudia! Thank You for saying so! :D I had fun making them and especially Rusting them! :D

      elizabeth

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  35. Morning Elizabeth,
    I has been ages since I have been by, cause I only know how to get here by when you come by to see me, as I am not on google +............but happily saw where you commented on an old post this morning I happened to go to............so thought oh my I have to go visit her. So clicked on it and finally found your email to here..
    Anyway, can see you are still the creative genius you always have been..........
    Love these lil fretwork pcs. ..........you made them so realistic.....now are you gonna
    use them for planters?? or something else??
    Hope you have been doing well hon.............nice to be here, and hope you are
    enjoying life.
    Fall Blessings, Nellie

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    1. Hi Nellie! I am Very Pleased to see your smiling face again, and Thank You for your compliment! :D In answer to your question about how I am going to use them: I plan on using them for my next (and LAST) doll's house project as planters. I won't fill them with flowers until I get to the stage where I can feel confident that whatever I fill them with, I won't be later be pulling out!
      ( I have a habit of doing that ) :/
      God's Blessings to you too Nellie :D

      elizabeth

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  36. Sorry i am so late Ms E! I a trying to get back in the digital box ;)

    Oh you've done it again havent you? Created wonders from found objects..stirred some inspiration in the pot of "I gotta do this!"

    I love rust on minatures, i feel like it brings a new feel to things in small, not enough rust going around these days!!!

    Ok..im getting off my rusted soap box, fabulous work Ms. E!

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    1. Ah Miss Jane! I am Very Pleased to learn that you are a loyal fan of Rusty too! :D For these old planters, I wished them to lay it on thick and this cinnamon method, allowed me to achieve the look I was after. I lucked out on the basketball toy. I was at the right place at the right time and they were the right price.
      And as the old Tag Team song goes:
      "(w)HOO(m) P, THERE IT IS! " :D

      elizabeth

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  37. I love rust too on miniatures, and your tip about cinnamon is fantastic. Rusty effect are so real Thank you, dear Elizabeth!

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  38. Hi Nono! I have always Greatly Admired the variety of the work that you do Nono, and so I am certain that you will be able to use this easy technique somewhere down the line. It has saved me hours of fiddling about trying to get the paint colors right and instead has given a more random scattering of the rust without making it look like mush!
    ENJOY! :D

    elizabeth

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  39. Hi Elizabeth! You sure have lot's of tricks up your sleeve! Who ever knew cinnamon could simulate rust. A little bit of this and that and you have rust on your baskets and they look great! I'm sure they will look quite at home outside on the patio near the ocean! Can't wait to see what you fill them up with!

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    1. Hi Lucille! This trick came from "up somebody else's sleeve" but I am quite happy to have discovered it there! Not only is this incredibly easy but, since I already enjoy making messes, it provides for that - as well as gives me the desired end results! :D
      However, I am still waiting to see where I will eventually place them; you just never know....

      elizabeth

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